Interview in Dagblad Trouw – Transitory Landscape  

Central museum acquires a downy landscape

the acquisition Henry de Lange

The work of Utrecht’s artist Jan Koen Lomans is hard to classify. Weaving, etching, printing, drawing, tufting; he does it all. He also thinks up new techniques, such as a special melting process, to take the themes that appear in his work – nature, transcience, birth – and not just represent them but also make them ‘palpable’. That might sound a bit vague, but if you see his artisanal work – and that certainly applies to his woven installations – you immediately understand what he means.

The Centraal Museum in Utrecht has bought two of his works, that are both representative of his experimental drive. One of them is a tryptych, made using his melting techniques. Here he ‘draws’ on polyester fabric using laser patterns. He melts together three or four layers of different coloured fabric into what he calls ‘molten paintings’.

The other purchase appears, at first glance, to be a tapestry several meters high in a maple frame. Lomans calls it a hand-tufted installation. The idea and design are his but it was made by Karen Zeedijk from the Textiellab of Tilburg’s Textielmuseum. In this lab artists can get their designs implemented with various techniques, from knitting and embroidery to weaving and tufting. Tufting is a weaving method that is used in the making of long pile carpets. Lomans gives this a new twist by using unusual or delicate fabrics such as mohair or lurex. After all, his ‘carpet’ is not meant to be walked on. Although it looks so soft and downy that you would probably want to touch it.

Curious about Jan Koen Loman’s work? The Centraal Museum has dedicated a small exhibition to it until August 25th.

Trouw 06-07-2013 De Aanwinst bijgesneden kopie